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Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Did The Hemophilia Gene Reach Queen Victoria From Nathan Mayer Rothschild?



The children of Tsar Nicholas. Alexei the only son had hemophilia. All were granchildren of Queen Victoria. Haemophilia spread into many of Europe's Royal families from her. But how did she get the gene? It did not exist in her official parents' families. This is strong evidence that Victoria was illegitimate. But who was her father, and where is the evidence that that family had hemophilia?

The arrival of hemophilia amongst Europe's Royal families, when Queen Victoria gave birth to a hemophiliac son, shocked everyone. There was no evidence of the hereditary disease in Queen Victoria's official parents or their predecessors. Yet many of her children and their subsequent heirs became hemophiliacs and died tragically young.

Prince Albert, the son of a stable lad called Henstein, and the father of most of Queen Victoria's brood, if not all, was also illegitimate and not a Coburg-Gotha at all. His official name nonetheless delivered two of the current royal family's three surnames - Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. Henstein was made to disappear for convenience, but there is as yet nothing to suggest he was a hemophiliac or that his real parents carried the gene, which has since plagued Europe's Royal families for well over a century.


The question as to who Queen Victoria's father was appears the key to where the illness came from. The fact that the illness started so suddenly in a family not previously affected is itself strong evidence that Queen Victoria was illegitimate.

Other sources are stating that Queen Victoria's real father was Nathan Mayer Rothschild (Greg Hallett quoting secret sevice source), and there are likenesses to him amongst later offspring such as Winston Churchill (the illegitimate son of Edward 7th). Is there any hard evidence that the Rothschilds have suffered from the hemophiliac gene, and could have passed it on to Queen Victoria's descendants? At this point I can't see evidence from a historical perspective. All I can see from a quick internet search is that a Chantal Rothschild is a significant hemophilia researcher in France, and there are donations to a USA hemophilia association from Rothschild-owned banks, and a legal practice carrying the Rothschild name. It's not much to go on, but at this early stage I am really just beginning to look around.

It would be an important confirming piece of evidence to finally prove the link between the head banking family in the world with the most important royal family in the world. From these two the primary political figures of the twentieth century emerged, Hitler, Stalin and Churchill (if N.M.R. fathered Victoria) all being illegitimate descendants of the Rothschilds.

Is there any more suggestion of the Rothschilds having a hemophilia gene connection in the past? The disease can jump six generations so you could look back several centuries. I am reading the history of the Rothschilds by Niall Ferguson so I will keep a look out for any hints, or paths for further investigation. It's just that any historical explanation of how the Rothschilds controlled politicans and royal families, cannot ignore the hemophilia element. That too has to be explained.




See The Royal Disease and the fascinating family tree which shows Queen Elizabeth 2 was born into the line from Edward 7th, which has been hemophilia free, while the Duke Of Edinburgh's side, coming from Alice, has been hemophilia-free for only two generations, and be more likely to still potentially carry the hemophilia gene.

POSSIBLE HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE - A Rothschild legal practice funds a Society for Hemophiliacs in the USA.

Chantal Rothschild is a leading expert and frequent author on hemophilia in France.

Maybe all just coincidence. But if the hemophilia gene was an occasional visitor to the Rothschild family, such modern-day links would not be unlikely to remain and be visible.

The question history doesn't answer is who brought hemophilia into the Royal Family? the answer must be there somewhere, so let's keep looking.

Historically the disease is mentioned in Jewish histories, especially regarding circumcision - as in this extract - Rabbi Simon ben Gamaliel
forbade a boy to be circumcised because the sons of
his mother's three elder sisters had died after
circumcision (Rothschild, 1882, qu. Bullock and...


Hemophilia a predominantly Jewish disease

Hemophilia C « IHTC
www.ihtc.org › ... › Blood Disorders › Bleeding Disordersby C Hemophilia - Related articles
Throughout the world, persons of Ashkenazi (European) Jewish descent and Iraqi Jews are most commonly affected by hemophilia

TAP We appear to be searching for a Jewish male of European descent who had known access to Queen Victoria's mother, and who in turn attracted kind acts of favour from Queen Victoria. As Jews were not acceptable within British High Society, apart from Nathan Mayer Rothschild, the trail is getting a lot warmer. Queen Victoria made an exception for him to become the first Jewish British Lord allowed into The Lords, and his son Lionel to become the first Jewish MP in the British Parliament. It's not case proved beyond all doubt, but it appears we might be getting close to claiming a persuasive case. Hallett, who makes a number of wild assertions in his books, might yet be right in his claim that N.M.Rothschild fathered Queen Victoria. Who else?

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

http://www.theworldoftruth.net/GH/elevation/Knighthood.htm

Anonymous said...

I do believe queen victoria is real true daughter of Edward duke of Kent because they are look like nose, eyes and mouth....Queen victoria and her mother are different look like not. Edward duke of Kent's queen Victoria's real father, because when Edward was 30 yrs old unmarried he met gypsy woman and she said to him ''you will have a daughter and she will become a great queen''. I'm sure Edward is Victoria's real father. How did Victoria get carrier hemophilia? I think might someone curse young Victoria.

Tapestry said...

Likeness in families can move around, uncles like nephews, grandparents like grandchildren, sons unlike fathers and so on. That said, hemophilia is a genetically inherited condition, and had to come from somewhere other than a bad word from a gypsy!

Xander Taylor said...

Hallett seems to have a gift for identifying these family connections, so I would side with his claim, however wild. And I must go with scientific evidence over the word of a Gypsy (and I love Gypsies, having Gypsy ancestry myself).

Toad Hall said...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20782442

Jane Ridley's Bertie: A Life of Edward VII is published by Chatto & Windus. Queen Victoria's Children is broadcast on BBC Two on Tuesday 1, Wednesday 2, and Thursday 3 January at 21:00 GMT

Anonymous said...

30% are new mutations. Victoria's hemophilia was type B, the Jewish type of hemophilia is Type C, so they are unlikely to be linked.

Anonymous said...

The answer seems to be in the article with the following sentences: "Is there any more suggestion of the Rothschilds having a hemophilia gene connection in the past? The disease can jump six generations so you could look back several centuries." If it can jump six generations and is passed down through the mother, then obviously Queen Victoria inherited it from her mother. Victoria probably had little knowledge of her maternal line back six generations and since childhood deaths were normal perhaps no one noticed that the children had died from excessive bleeding and thought it were the accidents that killed them. Also I wonder about unknown or yet undiscovered possibilities such as since Victoria and Albert were cousins perhaps there is some unknown that would make it more likely to appear in their children. Sign me Vicky too

SR said...

What is it about some people who are always looking for a scandal amongst the famous, particularly families like the Royals? Is it because their wealth is inherited? I can assure you we are not all at it like rabbits (yes, rabbits, not rabbis) with every Tom, Dick, Harry and his dog, nor would we want to. In case you were not aware of it, haemophilia was still relatively unheard of when Queen Victoria's son, Prince Leopold was born. The condition has disappeared from living descendants of Queen Victoria as quickly as it first appeared. There is also the suggestion that, as Edward, Duke of Kent fathered Queen Victoria late in life (I believe he was in his fifties), it was the contributory factor that lead to the development of haemophilia. A man's DNA in his sperm deteriorates with age as with everything else. Even Henry VIII had trouble getting an erection after his third wife's death! A defective gene is not necessarily an inherited one as in Victoria's case, although her son Leopold and two of her daughters, who were also carriers, inherited it. One of my grandmothers was a carrier of a defective gene and she produced a son with haemophilia (the second son of four boys). There is no history of it in the family, although it was assumed my grandmother's mother may have been a carrier, but my grandmother had five brothers and no sisters and none of them or their families were affected. As my uncle didn't have children of his own, the condition has disappeared. My uncle lived to the age of 69 years and died of lung cancer. You don't realise how hurtful you are being for suggesting someone was illegitimate, just because of a condition that was previously unheard of in a family. Sometimes, unexplainable things can go wrong in the womb, including birth defects and abnormalities, e.g. albinoism, dwarfism, Downs Syndrome, where there is no previous history. That's the risk you take, when you decide to have a family. Like it's strange how some women who carry a defective gene may have one son in four who has haemophilia, whereas the other three are unaffected. Dominant and recessive genes differ from one sibling to another. That doesn't suggest one child in four is the result of an affair. If you think that, you don't know my grandmother. Some people always think the worst of others and say the vilest things about the dead who cannot defend themselves. The Royal Family will not get embroilled in such controversies. Furthermore, if the Churchills descend from the Rothschilds and there is no history of haemophilia in the Churchill family, then the Rothschilds could not have passed the defective gene to Queen Victoria and, furthermore, a man can only pass a defective gene if he has haemophilia. A man cannot be a carrier of a recessive gene that produces full blown haemophilia in sons and daughters as carriers, so unless you have irrefutable evidence that Nathan Meyer Rothschild had haemophilia, he cannot have been Victoria's father. I hope that puts an end to your silly theories.

Tapestry said...

The haemophilia gene can jump up to five generations.

Tapestry said...

The source for Rothschild being Victoria's father was not my own theorising, but secret service, as related by Greg Hallet.

I apologise for my ignorance in all matters. That's why I write a blog - to try to wok out what is going on. The story we are told quite clearly is false. Queen Victoria was illegitimate, by common agreement amongst most conventional historians. The point of interest is who really was her father. The theory that it was Nathan mayer Rothschild helps to explain all kinds of things that happened, not just the arrival of haemophilia in the Royal households of Europe.

Anonymous said...

As someone pointed above, if Victoria was fathered by NMR, the only way she could have gotten the haemophilia gene from him is if he was himself a carrier - which in a man means sick. It should be known information?
Also there should be more haemophiliacs amongst his legitimate descendants.
A new mutation in Queen Victoria makes more sense...

Tapestry said...

Haemophilia can carry unseen for five generations. There are Rothschilds involved in haemophilia charities.

Anonymous said...

It can carry unseen if it is transmitted by women - since it is an X-linked trait it won't be expressed in them, thanks to their second X chromosome. In a man since there is only one X, it should be expressed. You might find different degrees of expression (severe or less severe hemophilia) but it should still be seen in NMR...

Tapestry said...

It seems from the family tree the disease can be stopped by not breeding from haemophiliac males. Nowadays maybe the disease can be detected by gene analysis in females too and they too can be stopped from breeding. I am talking about in pastimes.

Leopold, Queen Victoria's son, the chart suggests, suffered from haemophilia, yet he was permitted to breed. Whoever Queen Victoria's father was must have been a haemophilia carrier with not much in the way of symptoms. Otherwise presumably the disease could have been stopped using the 'don't breed from haemophiliac male' strategy.

No family will advertise its genetic disorders publicly, especially a very rich and powerful one. The Queen had a sister who was shut away all her life having of a mild development disorder, for example. The suppression of the not-so-perfect was brutally carried out at that time in all aristocratic and powerful families, making the truth hard to get at.

In-breeding is bound to throw up a bigger number of genetic defects than mixing up genes, and many family members were hidden away when known to be of less than perfect genetic material.

Anonymous said...

There are different forms of hemophilia caused by different genetic mutations. Spontaneous mutations are not infrequent - see Robert K and Suzanne Massie's story, for instance. It is much more likely that Victoria suffered from a spontaneous mutation than that she inherited it. If she had inherited it, either her father would have had to visibly suffer from hemophilia or her mother would have been a carrier which is not likely given that there was no evidence of hemophilia in the family before Victoria.

A carrier is defined as someone who has a healthy X chromosome and a hemophilia mutation on the other X chromosome. Thus, the probability that Victoria's daughters would be carriers is 50% and two out of four were obviously carriers as their descendants suffered from the disease. The probability that Victoria's sons would be sick with hemophilia is also 50% but it's all a roll of the dice and she was lucky there - only one of four sons was sick.

I would recommend Massie's book "Journey" for anyone interested in learning more about hemophilia and its real impact on its victims and their families. You might also want to read about Massie's son, an Episcopalian minister also named Robert, who survived the AIDS epidemic that killed most American hemophiliacs before blood donors could be screened. He's an interesting man in his own right who has spent his life working to help people around the world and who is now cured of hemophilia.

Anonymous said...

Several things I must say/point out after reading your article:

1) The children of Tsar Nicholas II were not the grandchildren of Queen Victoria - they were her great-grandchildren. Their mother Alix was the granddaughter of Victoria.

2) You state "The fact that the illness started so suddenly in a family not previously affected is itself strong evidence that Queen Victoria was illegitimate." By saying this, you completely discount the scientific fact that spontaneous mutations can occur in the gene responsible for hemophilia.

3) You give absolutely no evidence for Prince Albert being illegitimate, only mention innuendo.

4) You infer, again without benefit of evidence, that Prince Albert wasn't the father of all of Victoria's children.

5) You imply that Hitler is illegitimately related to the Rothchilds - again without any evidence.

And those are just the "highlights" in your article. Lacking evidence with every sentence you write, I can't see how you consider yourself a serious student of history.