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Thursday, July 17, 2008

See Suppressed Irish Anti-Lisbon Poster


The number of anti-Lisbon groups operating throughout Ireland is quite mind-boggling. Although Libertas' campaign got all the coverage, and had the largest amount of money to spend, the quality of some of the smaller campaigns has been overlooked.

The Group Coir, for example operating in Longford produced a great little poster depicting three monkeys giving their opinions about the EU. The Local Council had them all torn down, and sent Coir 300 Euros compensation. See HERE.

It seems a shame that such a good poster doesn't get wider coverage so I'm putting it on here so more people can see it. Nice work Coir.

I've been browsing www.politics.ie a political forum in Ireland. It is quite striking how the majority of the views are so eurosceptic, openly discussing the merits of leaving the EU, and the Euro, and establishing a Norway kind of relationship. The NO side of the argument in Ireland seems remarkably buoyant given all the hostility coming their way from President Sarkozy and others desperate to push the LIsbon Treaty through.

The Irish Times tells that Sarkozy has cancelled his planned meeting with the NO side, in his whistle stop tour to Ireland on Monday. See HERE. Sarkozy recently demanded a second referendum take place, but is now retrenching, as Ireland's politicians are worried about such a suggestion being made and backed by an outsider. It seems to be antagonising local opinion. The YES side are all ears and eyes at the moment, and making right chimps of themselves!

See REPORT from Open Europe - below -

Sarkozy advisor: Irish should vote again, but on a slightly different text

Sarkozy pulls out of meeting with 'No' campaigners


Numerous papers report that the Irish government is "privately furious" following French President Nicolas Sarkozy's demand on Tuesday that Ireland will have to hold a second Lisbon Treaty referendum.



"It is far, far too early to be talking about a referendum or about some specific policy to go forward," the Irish European Affairs Minister, Dick Roche, told Newstalk radio. He said that "rash" proposals were "not helpful", adding, "That's not the way to formulate a policy in response to a referendum." Foreign Minister Miche√°l Martin said: "We have no intention of letting ourselves be intimidated by anyone. We are going to study it from the Irish point of view, according to what best serves Ireland's interests."



However, when asked if he favoured holding a second referendum, Taoiseach Brian Cowen did not exclude the possibility, telling the Irish Independent: "The Government haven't given any thought about where we go from here until we actually assess, examine and analyse the outcome of the referendum."



The Irish Times reports that plans for Sarkozy to meet in public with anti-Lisbon Treaty campaigners have been scrapped, "following last-minute nervousness" on the French side.



According to AFP, a key adviser to Sarkozy confirmed on French television yesterday that a second vote was a very real possibility. "One of the solutions would be indeed to eventually ask the Irish to re-vote, but probably not on a text that would be exactly the same," said Henri Guaino.



Le Figaro reports that "the idea of a new vote worries Ireland". On his blog, Libération journalist Jean Quatremer writes: "As the probability of Ireland's total political isolation becomes more likely every day, what is the solution to the crisis? In order for the Lisbon Treaty to be able to enter into force, a new referendum must inevitably be organised... As no-one wants to renegotiate a new treaty - with the risk of a new crisis - the idea is to offer Ireland the same text accompanied with declarations designed to respond to the Irish concerns." He says if the Irish vote no again, "the Lisbon Treaty would be definitively buried."



The Economist blog notes that "Mr Sarkozy had his work cut out for him in Ireland even before his latest remarks. By appearing to dictate a preferred course of action to the Irish, he has made his job that much harder."



Roger Cole of the Peace and Neutrality Alliance argues in the Irish Times that the No vote struck a blow against Sarkozy's "militarist" vision of the EU.

UPDATE - New Irish Anti-Lisbon Poster



Print copy available HERE.

UPDATE - The Group COIR's 2nd Lisbon campaign is far more professional than the 1st one was, and very impressive. Worth a look at www.coircampaign.org .

See a series of angry Irish anti-Lisbon posters HERE including the second in the series 'European Democracy'.

1 comment:

Craig said...

The Group Coir, for example operating in Longford produced a great little poster depicting three monkeys giving their opinions about the EU. The Local Council had them all torn down, and sent Coir 300 Euros compensation.

To be fair, the three monkeys found their way to many towns and cities in Ireland, and were generally not taken down - they became quite famous nationwide.

However the action of the Longford local council was blatantly political and I was glad to expose it on the blog. Thanks for linking to it.